Bekki the Fairy talks to Malcolm and Nia from The Magic Pencil

Bekki the Fairy meets Malcolm and Nia from The Magic Pencil

Bekki the Fairy with Malcolm and Nia
Bekki meets Malcolm and Nia from The Magic Pencil

Bekki: Hello Malcolm, I am Bekki the Fairy from London and it is simply, frightfully splendid to meet you. As you can see I speak like the Queen. Or should I say “Yo, Malcolm, what’s the haps?’

Malcolm: Hello there Bekki! Veddy nice to make your acquaintance.

Bekki: I love the way you talk. The words just slide out! Are you allowed to talk like that in school?

Malcolm: Thanks! Glad you appreciate and unnerstan my usin it. Naw, in school the teachers want us to speak standard English. Sometimes I get away with it if I’m havin a quiet convo with one because they know I know when not to use it! They usually know what I’m sayin too.

A black teen with his hands in his pockets
Don’t try to stress Malcolm, not gonna happen

Bekki: My brother Sam is very good at school but he is not cool. He says things like lickety split and jeepers creepers. Can you please help him to sound more cool?

Malcolm: Probly, but it might take a minute. That means a long time. But it can mean a short time too! A lot of the meanin of a word depends on how it’s said an in what context! An, if you can see the person, you gotta watch the way they move too. You know, understand they body language! Hey, do you see how I mix up the ways I talk together?

Bekki: I come from London but I am a mixture of Nigeria, Ghana, Brazil, Portugal and Scotland. Are you a mixture?

Malcolm: I ain had my DNA done yet, haha. But I think everybody is all a – uh – “mixture”. That sounds better than sayin you “mixed”. Makes it soun like talkin about dogs. Science says we all from Africa, anyway.

Bekki: What kinds of music do you like?

Malcolm: A lot. I got an open mine. You could dig for gold an fine it in there, haha. But I do like a lot of different kinds. That’s anotha thing that’s mixed!

Bekki: Do your relatives from Jamaica like reggae music? Do you?

Malcolm: Mostly. I like it now. I had to get used to it, though. My dad plays it a lot when we ridin together. He plays a lot of the classics and even new stuff.

Bob Marley’s hair looked great on stage

Bekki: What is the best thing about your mum?

Malcolm: Awwww… Moms is great! We have our discrepancies but mostly we cool. She lets me be me as much as possible. And I respect her madly.

Bekki: I have one dad. Is it good having two?

Malcolm: Well, Mom an Jam ain married, yet. But he’s like another dad, and real fun! He got jokes! Dad is basically a standard dad. We cool an all but he don’t play unless it’s wit a soccer ball! Both a them treat me good and I always learn somethin new from em.

Bekki: I go to school in Dagenham where they used to make cars. What’s your favourite car and who is your favourite racing driver?

Malcolm: Right now, I like the Ferrari 488GTB. It got a twin-turbo 3.9-liter V-8 engine and can do 8000 rpm! It’s sweeeeeeeeet! I still like Lewis Hamilton. I like Nicole Lyons too! Bout time I found out about Black female drivers!

Bekki: What do you think of Lewis Hamilton?

Malcolm: He’s a baaaaad Brit brotha! Plus, he’s got a foundation so it makes me know he ain all bout the Benjamins – or whatever they call em where he lives. You know, the money, right?

Lewis Halmilton in leathers on a motorbike
Lewis is not bad, he’s baaaaad

Bekki: Will your mum and dad let you fuse your hair?

Malcolm: Oh, you mean grow locs? Well, I’m not a Rasta – oh, Rastafarian. That’s like a religion thang. They call theirs dreadlocks. I guess they will. Dad wants me to wait til I’m older cuz he thinks Mom won’t like em. But I think she won’t mind.

Bekki: Do you want me to do a magic spell to make your hair as long as your friend Nia’s?

Malcolm: Hahaha! Not really. I think it’ll be fun to let it do its own fusion in its own time!

Bekki: My baby-sitter Ruby saw Beyoncé when she came to London and showed me the video on her phone. Did you see Beyoncé when she sang a reggae song when she was on tour in America?

Beyonce singing and smiling
She’s global- Beyonce in Detroit

Malcolm: Nope. I only seen the videos. She’s done A LOT of reggae stuff! She’s global.

Bekki: I have a question for Nia. Nia, mum won’t let me use my magic wand to do my homework. Do you think that magic is good for homework?

Nia: Not really. It’s kind of cheating, don’t you think? You really won’t learn much more than how to use it better!

Bekki: (changing the subject quickly) I do skipping too. I like the rhyming songs. Have you got any good ones to share with me, please?

Little black girl in school uniform skipping beside a brick wall

Nia: Yep! It’s the kind where you sort of run while you’re jumping. Ms. Quayle, one of my teachers, wrote the rhyme. It’s about a very smart boy named Wyatt. You say the first two parts and jump kind of fast. Then, when you say the third part you go really fast and stomp as you jump. Then you do the same steps for the next three parts. Everyone sings: “Quiet Wyatt! The grow folk say When-I-get-into-their-talking. You’re being smart, Now run and play. I-shake-my-head-as-I-start-walking.”

Bekki: I like rhyming. In London some people use Cockney rhyming slang. It is like a puzzle that you have to work out. So if I say ‘A cup of Rosie’ it means ‘a cup of tea’. Because Rosie Lee rhymes with tea! Can you guess what a syrup is? I’ll give you a clue – it goes on a bald man’s head!*

Malcolm: Uhhhhhhhhh, a stirrup?

Nia: Hmmm. A maple leaf!

Malcolm & Nia (in unison): Who’s right?

Bekki:  Hee hee, nobody is right- a syrup is a wig – it rhymes with syrup of figs.  But most wig shops don’t use that word so don’t make a fool of yourself!

Don’t ask for a syrup in this Brixton shop.

Bekki: If the Pencil Fairy said she would give you whatever pencils you wanted what kind would you ask for? And what would you use them for?

Malcolm: A mechanical one with a never-ending lead and self- regenerating, not-smeary eraser. Plus, I can tell it to make its lead thicker or thinner, darker or lighter and harder or softer! That way I could use it for everything!

Nia: I guess the same thing would work for me. But I’d want mine to also change the lead’s color!

Bekki: My favourite teacher is Miss Treacle because she is kind and funny. She teaches science to my baby-sitters and to my brother, Sam. Who is your favourite teacher and why?

Nia: Oh, I love Ms. Winston. She is the perfect educator! But I also love Mr. Skye. I help him with the kindergarten kids. He is soooo wise and kind.

A drawing of malcolm with his hands in his pockets

Malcolm: Hey Ms. Smarty, you sposed to name only one. I think mine’s Ms. Winston too because she keeps us learning and understands I get bored a lot. But Ms. Kady, the sub, is cool too. She makes things real excitin! I think she’s a chameleon cuz she changes up when she gotstuh!

Nia: You “sposed to name ON-LY one”, boy!

Malcolm: OK. Then I name ME. I teach my self to learn, gurl!

Bekki: Nia, what do you like about Malcolm?

Nia: Malcolm is a great friend; understanding and … loyal.

Close up of the faces of Malcolm and Nia
Nia is never boring…but who is she?

Bekki: And Malcolm what do you like about Nia?

Malcolm: Uh, she’s OK. Hahaha! Fa real, Nia is intriguing; never boring.

Bekki: Who wrote a book about you guys and why?

Malcolm & Nia: (in unison) Ms. Karen E. Dab-ney!

Malcolm: Well, she wants to get kids to read who may not know the fun part of it and she doesn’t think they have to stop talking one way to talk another way.

Nia: She likes to say “Teach and Lead. Reach and Read!” That means a teacher needs to figure out how to encourage children to want to read by figuring out what they need!

Bekki: Will you be in more books?

Malcolm: Oh, yeah. “Play Mom”, that’s what we call Ms. Dabney, is trying to decide what we will be doing next.

Nia: I think she wants to have us save the world! Maybe one book at a time.

Bekki: It has been marvellously, splendid and a’ight talking to you, Malcolm and Nia. Can we be friends?

Malcolm: Call me Malc. An, yeah. You gotta teach us some magical stuff, though.

Nia: Of course, we can, Bekki! Don’t pay any attention to Malcolm. I can tell he likes you! And I do too. 

Bekki:  C’mon, I’ll show you my wand.

Time to See The Books:

Do you want to read about Malcolm and Nia and learn code-switchin to talk like Malc?

Malcolm and Nia appear in the book The Magic Pencil.  Click on the title or pic to see the book on Amazon.  You can look inside the book too!

Drawings of Malcolm and Nia with twinkling stars

And Malcolm is on the cover of a book called The Magic Pencil Black Language Glossary. This cool book will teach you to speak Black English – take all the un-nessry letters out of your words and just flow.  Try it…it might change how you feel about words.  Malcolm will guide you.  Get learnin

Drawing of Malcolm with his hands in his pockets
check this out to learn about conversatin and communicatin – it’s what it’s all about

The Elephant and the King for Multicultural Children’s Book day 2018

Today on my blog I am celebrating Multicultural Children’s Book Day 2018 by telling you about  a book called The Elephant and the King

Let me tell you the background to MCBD

Multicultural Children’s Book Day 2017 (1/27/18) is in its 5th year and was founded by Valarie Budayr from Jump Into A Book and Mia Wenjen from PragmaticMom. Our mission is to raise awareness of the ongoing need to include kids’ books that celebrate diversity in home and school bookshelves while also working diligently to get more of these types of books into the hands of young readers, parents and educators.

Book cover showing drawing of two children surrounded by African wild animals
Front cover of The Elephant and the King by Sylvia Medina

My Book

I was given my book by our sponsor Green Kids Club. They create gorgeous colourful picture books to teach children about the planet, its ecosystems and the creatures who live here.    My book is one of a series where two children Maya and Victor drink water from The Green Spring and are granted the ability to talk to animals.

So, are you ready to pay attention?

I am going to:

-tell you what I think about the book

-tell you my idea for an activity to encourage reading 

-tell you about the Twitter party

-tell you where you can go to find more books about our fabulous planet.

My book review

Series:Green Kids Club

Age: 7 upwards

Source: Sylvia M Medina (author)

This colourful book is gentle in tone and charming in its illustrative style.  This means it is able to deliver a tough message without upsetting even a sensitive  child.  Victor and Maya are visiting Botswana and meeting their friend Maatla when Maya asks to see an elephant,

young girl with backpack close up
An innocent request

Maya’s desire to see an elephant worries her friend Maatla as he is aware that the elephants are under attack from  poachers.  The children learn that there are people who will kill an elephant to take the tusks.  Tusks are a unique substance for carving and they are valuable in Asia.  (Woolly mammoths had tusks too and you don’t see many of them about. )

An African boy points at an elephant and a poacher holding a tusk
Weeeell. maybe

Maatla takes the children to look for elephants and, inevitably, drama and excitement follow.  Maya and Victor have magic powers that allow them to help animals and those powers can be shared with.  Maatla is given the same gift and he is stupefied when he can suddenly hear animals speaking.  The ending is a happy one but pages of facts at the back of the book open children’s eyes to an unpleasant situation going on in the world right now.

If you read this book to your children you mighy tell them that public opinion persuaded the Chinese to ban the sale of ivory.  Young eco-warriors need messages of hope.  Despite the poachers’ activities, this book gives a strong sense of that Africa’s animals are precious and valued.  

This is the first and only book I have read from this series.  Animal lovers will find many more on Amazon.

My activity to encourage reading

Remember I said I had an activity?  OK, here is my book gift package idea.

The story about the baby elephant in danger got me thinking.  And when kids start thinking they want to play.  How about when  you go to Amazon to buy this book head on over to the page where they sell African animals.  It is called Schleich and they have all the animals from The Elephant and the King.

You can act out the exciting scenes where the baby elephant is in danger and the lion and the other animals get involved.

I want to be Maya. You can be a warthog.

The Twitter party?

Join in by typing #ReadYourWorld

TWITTER PARTY Sponsored by Scholastic Book Clubs: MCBD’s super-popular (and crazy-fun) annual Twitter Party will be held 1/27/18 at 9:00pm.

Join the conversation and win one of 12-5 book bundles and one Grand Prize Book Bundle (12 books) that will be given away at the party! http://multiculturalchildrensbookday.com/twitter-party-great-conversations-fun-prizes-chance-readyourworld-1-27-18/

 

You want more great books – start with great publishers. 

Where? Here!  These guys have sponsored us because they care about Multicultural books enough to publish them.

2018 MCBD Medallion Sponsors HONORARY: Children’s Book Council, Junior Library Guild PLATINUM:Scholastic Book Clubs GOLD:Audrey Press, Candlewick Press, Loving Lion Books, Second Story Press, Star Bright Books, Worldwide Buddies SILVER:Capstone Publishing, Author Charlotte Riggle, Child’s Play USA, KidLit TV, Pack-n-Go Girls, Plum Street Press BRONZE: Barefoot Books, Carole P. Roman, Charlesbridge Publishing, Dr. Crystal Bowe, Gokul! World, Green Kids Club, Gwen Jackson, Jacqueline Woodson, Juan J. Guerra, Language Lizard, Lee & Low Books, RhymeTime Storybooks, Sanya Whittaker Gragg, TimTimTom Books, WaterBrook & Multnomah, Wisdom Tales Press

2018 Author Sponsors Honorary Author Sponsors: Author/Illustrator Aram Kim and Author/Illustrator Juana Medina Author Janet Balletta, Author Susan Bernardo, Author Carmen Bernier-Grand, Author Tasheba Berry-McLaren and Space2Launch, Bollywood Groove Books, Author Anne Broyles, Author Kathleen Burkinshaw, Author Eugenia Chu, Author Lesa Cline-Ransome, Author Medeia Cohan and Shade 7 Publishing, Desi Babies, Author Dani Dixon and Tumble Creek Press, Author Judy Dodge Cummings, Author D.G. Driver, Author Nicole Fenner and Sister Girl Publishing, Debbi Michiko Florence, Author Josh Funk, Author Maria Gianferrari, Author Daphnie Glenn, Globe Smart Kids, Author Kimberly Gordon Biddle, Author Quentin Holmes, Author Esther Iverem, Jennifer Joseph: Alphabet Oddities, Author Kizzie Jones, Author Faith L Justice , Author P.J. LaRue and MysticPrincesses.com, Author Karen Leggett Abouraya, Author Sylvia Liu, Author Sherri Maret, Author Melissa Martin Ph.D., Author Lesli Mitchell, Pinky Mukhi and We Are One, Author Miranda Paul, Author Carlotta Penn, Real Dads Read, Greg Ransom, Author Sandra L. Richards, RealMVPKids Author Andrea Scott, Alva Sachs and Three Wishes Publishing, Shelly Bean the Sports Queen, Author Sarah Stevenson, Author Gayle H. Swift Author Elsa Takaoka, Author Christine Taylor-Butler, Nicholette Thomas and MFL Publishing Author Andrea Y. Wang, Author Jane Whittingham Author Natasha Yim

We’d like to also give a shout-out to MCBD’s impressive CoHost Team who not only hosts the book review link-up on celebration day, but who also works tirelessly to spread the word of this event. View our CoHosts HERE.

Don’t forget the teachers

Free Multicultural Books for Teachers: http://bit.ly/1kGZrta

Free Empathy Classroom Kit for Homeschoolers, Organizations, Librarians and Educators: http://multiculturalchildrensbookday.com/teacher-classroom-empathy-kit/

Hashtag: Don’t forget to connect with us on social media and be sure and look for/use our official hashtag #ReadYourWorld.

 

 

Geeky Mikita – physics genius, baby-sitter and STEMINIST

Geeky  Mikita was very flattered to be invited to do an interview for the STEMINIST website.  

cute cartoon of schoolgirl with afro hair
Brainiac baby-sitter Geeky Mikita

The STEMINIST website interviews women who work in STEM.  If you ever wondered what jobs a girl might do in Science, Technology, Engineering or Maths then have  a look at some of the things these women get up to. You are gonna be impressed- and maybe even a little bit envious but inspired too!

Just for example; Melissa works with sharks.  Judith went to Jordan to teach girls about water in their environment, Islin is a “weather junkie” in Alaska and she has very good advice for girls picking a career,

Here is Mikita’s quote about her heroes:

“Stephen Hawking is an impressive multi-tasker and so is Beyonce. Stephen Hawking is a cosmologist as well as a theoretical physicist and Beyonce is a mum as well as a musical genius. They are like me cos I had to babysit and do my homework at the same time.”

You can read her full STEMINIST interview here.

Top 12 best Natural Hair books for children

a tiny black girl plays in the hair of a giant black girl
Art from Emi’s Curly, Coily, Cotton Candy Hair

I have always loved long curly hair and as a teenager I used to draw girls with flowing tresses (we did not have he phrase “slayed tresses” in Ireland back then).  My own hair is fine, uber-straight and incapable of holding any kind of curl or kink. So drawing curls was the closest I got. And photographing Barbies for BlackHair magazine.

But not everyone who is capable of curls wears their hair curly.  There are plenty of reasons for that  – which I won’t go into here – but part of it has to do with confidence.

If you think your child might be a naturalista who would like to wear their hair in a natural afro then a book featuring BIG HAIR might guide their journey. When kids are young it’s all about self-image and empowerment.    And that’s where books come in.  Some books are not specifically about hair but feature a character with a natural style. Most are in the 3 and upwards age-range.

So let’s go. Here is a list of the Top 15 best big hair books for children.  

1.Big Hair Don’t Care by Crystal Swain-Batesdrawing of a little girl with an afro smiling with her hands in the air
Most of my book choices feature a child of African descent living outside of Africa and therefore surrounded by European hair.  In this book a chirpy little girl faces that situation head on with her poem.

“I’ve got big hair and I don’t care
And even though the kids may stare
I lift my hands up in the air
And smile and say…
I love my hair”

2. Color My Fro by Crystal Swain-Bates

I’m mentioning Crystal Swain-Bates again because she has  made natural hair something of a cause.  Let Amazon guide you to books like Naturally Me, Black Fairy Tales, SuperMommy and many others where the covers depict fabulous fulsome black hair

3.Emi’s Curly Coily, Cotton Candy Hair by Tina Olajide

The artwork by Courtney Bernard is beautiful so I’ll let the pictures do the talking.

 

4.Daddy Do My Hair? Beth’s Twists by Tola Okogwu

A black daddy styles his little girl's long curly hair
This book has a sister book called Daddy Do My Hair-Hope’s Braids.  Art is by Rahima Begun. The author does book readings around London and has her very own blog called My Long Hair Journey.

5.Numbers with Bella by Lorraine O’Garro

This book has a Jamaican little girl with Afro puffs on the cover.  On the back cover the same girl in her contemporary clothes is seen slapping away happily on African drums.  As part of the Irish diaspora I appreciate books that make other people feel at home in all the countries they  identify with.  

The companion The Alphabet with Bella has artwork of her taking part in what I think is the Notting Hill Carnival waving her British and Jamaican flags and wearing a glorious feather crown.   Art is by ‎ Katlego Kgabale (Illustrator)

 

6.I Know I Can by Veronica M Chapman

Check out the gorgeous mother in this book with her skinny jeans and natural fro.  There is a sweet picture off the little girl sleeping with her hair in a silk scarf as she dreams of an exiting future visiting the  Paris, Cuba and Africa.  Daveia Odoi is the illustrator.

 
 
Usually in this series Lola wears her hair in cute twists but in this story both mum and Lola go natural.  Rosalind Beardshaw did the art.

a little girl with an afro hairstyle reads to her baby brother who is on her lap

 
 
 
This is my only book with a boy on the cover.  (I’ll fix that when I do  my blog about books with locs and braids).  Mike is always answering questions about being mixed.  He knows he’s perfect because this is what his parents say:
 
Mom and Dad say I’m a blend of dark and light: 
“We mixed you perfectly, and got you just right.”
 

10Happy Hair by Mechal Renee Roe 

Smiling young black girl reading a book
 
There was very little by way of a preview on Amazon so I hopped over to the author’s website –  This small and carefully curated site is a delight , well worth a look.  It has elegant, girlie art, three dancing bunny rabbits, prints for hanging and a colouring book.  And Mechal ships to Europe.
 
My own book has a strong theme of natural hair.  The lead character Bekki the Fairy has a crazy do (don’t ask) but the hairstyle you see most in the book is the loose natural style of Geeky Mikita the genius baby-sitter.  I updated the cover to add more of the baby-sitters.
 
 
A posh school, schoolgirls in the backdround and a fairy looking shocked.
Afrovisibility on the front cover
 
The stylist gave Mikita a grey streak in honour of Albert Einstein.  The other models wore their hair as they always had done – I hade worked with the models for years pior and each girl brought her own style – braids for Ruby, natural for Jada-Kai and with extensions for Keysha.
 
 
At the back of the book a real life scientist, Mumbi,  talked about black hair and gave all the baby-sitters hair advice.  There are jobs for female scientists in the hair industry.  Black women entrepreneurs played  big role in the products we have today.  In amongst all the silly scenes in my book is sneaky positive message!  
 
 
 African little girl with afro hair and a crown
 
This book really is ‘last but not least’.  Urbantoons  started following me on Instagram just as I was finishing up this blog.  I’m happy he did! He hails from Mali and has wonderful items (dashikis and hi-tops!)  on his website celebrating ethnicity, identity and the spread of multiculturalism. 
 
Have I missed any? Please let me know.

 

 

Where to buy beautiful black dolls online – Update

close up of light skinned black doll with long braids.
The Ava doll may be hard to find.

Anyone who knows me probably knows that I own far too many dolls for someone of my age.  My collection of Christie, Wesley, Madison, Nikki and other black Barbie dolls is being taken out of the cupboard for self-isolation. 

I wrote this post at Christmas so it needs to be updated.   There are many new dolls on the scene.  With the Corona Virus dolls are getting a lot of attention from doll artists on Instagram and doll events such as #ramandchariswedding on Insta are spreading the word about black dolls.

I am adding some new dolls – a mix of dolls for kids, grown women like me and men.

Disney Princess Tiana

Princess Tiana’s cosy look from the Wreck it Ralph sequel

Princess Tiana is an important doll – if we are talking about representation then that powerful group of Disney Princess really needs to have a black member.

The smallest of girls can cuddle a plush Tiana doll and the Disney company has the might to provide Princess Tiana as a black doll for al ages. She matters.

Tiana’s look from The Frog Prince

There are multiple Tiana dolls so I will just note this new comfy Tiana with natural curly, coily hair. She has always had an up do but the natural hair movement inspired a new approach to the doll’s hair.

Do you want a new doll?

I found this site when i was looking for Zuree the Patwa talking doll.  Kunaka Kids has a fabulous mix of “African and Caribbean Inspired” accessories, stationery, book  and, of course, dolls.  There is even a music box with a tiny Nia ballerina!  Very desirable and cute!

Nia Bellerina music box

The the doll range is extensive. The African dolls have African names and clothing and come in many different sizes – soft rags dolls, Barbie sized girls and sturdy little girl dolls. I will highlight the 14.5 inch Molemo dolls, proudly wearing their tribal colours- Xhosa, Ndebele and more.

The Zuree doll with her fiesty Jamaican voice box can be seen and heard here. She comes from London but I suspect her heart is in Jamaica.

These flashy 12inch dolls are beloved by adult collectors.  The collections of high end fashion dolls include the Ru Paul doll.  The Fashion Royalty collection, which is updated every year,  has dramatic characters with names like Dasha D’Amboise and Baroness Agnes Von Weiss. 

The Meteor Collection has characters of West African descent, Keeki and Zuri.

Black fashion doll in high fashion clothing
Keeki Adaeze™ from Integrity Toys’ Meteor Collection
Continue reading “Where to buy beautiful black dolls online – Update”

#KidLitArt – Fiverr meets Kei-Ling and the Ivory Princess

In my day I believe I was responsible for the most expensive children’s book illustrations ever.  My “Fairy in the Family” books with their lavish studio photos of real models absorbed all my spare cash.

Mum looks at her daughter who has a thought bubble containing a pig with pig-tails
We paid for models, dresses, dress-maker, photographer, designer, roses, pig, jewellery, toothbrush, fruit and pot scrubber.

I was intrigued to hear that I could buy illustrations for as little as five dollars from a website called Fiverr.  Fiverr is one of those new ‘gigging economy’ websites where sellers all over the planet offer tantalising art works.  The offers are presented in the first person “I will sing your jingle for a fiver”, “I will create your cartoon portrait for a fiver” and so on.

The website has the feel of an affordable sweetshop.  I have decided to give it a go for my book “Kei-Ling and the Ivory Princess”.  After looking at dozens of drawings I have settled on someone with very cure drawings on her profile page.

Cute drawing of a little girl sitting in the garden with her sausage dog
Can I get something this nice for only a fiverr?

 

The first thing I noticed was that while many people offer a service for a fiver, added extras can bump up the cost.  But the sellers vary widely in their pricing.  There are bargains to be had but also you can pay what you feel to be fair and right.  I would feel bad about paying five dollars for something this good.

I am very excited to think I can have something as lovely as this after a few days wait and a few euro going out of my PayPal account.

A cute drawing of a little girl dressed as a princess
Can I really have this for a Fiverr?I 

I have sent off my own version of a front cover to an artist in the Philippines.  I want a cover, not just a drawing and I want commercial rights so the cost is closer now to fifty than five and heading upwards.  I think this style will suit my characters and give them a professional, commercial look.

My own cover is here.  This labour of love took many hours with hand drawn pictures researched and coloured by hand.  I cannot wait to see how the artist reinterprets my drawing.

A Chinese little girl holds hands with an African girl in front of an African scene
Kei-Ling is magically transported to Africa